Hello nursing home, Goodbye cornet



  • I went straight from hospital to nursing home 3 weeks ago.

    So no more playing any instruments.

    Oy...



  • @moshe

    Is that so? Why? Are you immobile; wheelchair bound? What is there that prevents you from playing?


  • Global Moderator

    Sanka? You dead?



  • Here's wishing you a speedy and complete recovery.



  • Thought about the Silent Brass devices?



  • @moshe

    Don't give up. Find a way to keep on playing.



  • Sorry to hear that. ☹



  • Having known a few people in nursing homes, I can say most would enjoy a little concert in the common room. If I lived closer, I would bring the band over and you could play with us. I'll bet there's one near you that would also want to do that.



  • @moshe said in Hello nursing home, Goodbye cornet:

    I went straight from hospital to nursing home 3 weeks ago.

    So no more playing any instruments.

    Oy...
    Moshe,
    I’m very sorry that you have these health problems and hope that you can improve with time and therapy. If you are physically able to play your cornet, and want to play, why not do so. As was mentioned, most nursing homes have a common area, and most of these have pianos or key boards. There are bound to be other patients, staff, or visiting families, with musical skills who would find it as a fun activity, or even therapeutic, to join you, and then have other patients join in song. Alternatively for practice purposes, a practice mute would allow you to play without disturbing anyone else. If you are going to be living in the nursing home long term, as opposed to short term rehabilitation, and you don’t have a practice mute, email me ( ssmith1226@aol.com ) with your name and the address of the nursing home, and I will send you one.
    Lastly, if you feel that there will be problems doing the above, talk to the facility social worker about: 1) the possibility of, if you can ride in a car or van, providing transportation too and from local Community Band rehearsals, and 2) pointing out that Music Therapy is a recognized treatment modality and specialty that can be beneficial not only to you, but many other patients in the nursing home. If you don’t have a Music Therapist at your facility, and you do have a Recreational Therapist, or even Physical or Occupational Therapists, talk to them to see whether they can incorporate music in their programs. Another thought would be, in your conversation with the social worker, suggest that perhaps a volunteer program using local college or high school students, could be set up to start a music program in your facility.
    I hope that this helps. Get well soon!



  • @SSmith1226

    Muscle weakness made me unable to play above the staff the last 5 years.
    So no more Double C's.

    Then couldn't even play a scale the last couple of years.

    Now nursing home doesn't allow noise.
    And my playing is best described as "noise".

    But even Internet Wifi for the home was down for a week.
    Now THAT was worse than no cornet !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    moshe



  • Moshe - I'm still in the first few lessons in Harold Mitchell's book after coming back after almost two years. Five strokes. Sucks. But, finally, it's getting better. I don't know if this pertains to you. Only you know that.

    But what about Irish Pennywhistle, of piano etc. Are you too weak to do anything? As far as a low-noise policy, aren't there other rooms in the facility that you can use?

    My condolences. I know it's tough.



  • @Kehaulani said in Hello nursing home, Goodbye cornet:
    As far as a low-noise policy, aren't there other rooms in the facility that you can use?

    I used a Yamaha Silent mute when I had my 3 week stay in the hospital, several days of which were in the ICU. Nurses had no problems with me playing.


Log in to reply