Interesting composition tool: Impro-Visor



  • I stumbled across an interesting piece of software last week - Impro-Visor is a tool to help improvising musicians generate ideas.

    It looks like an academic project and has some quite sophisticated features for analysis of melodies or transcriptions. As I've just started to scratch the surface, I won't pass judgement on it at this stage, other than to warn you that, compared to modern score writing software, the interface is a bit of a pig - but the tools on offer look very interesting.

    The screenshot below shows a transcription of a Chet Baker solo that is an included sample file. You can see that notes can be highlighted as chord tones, approach notes or "outside the changes". It appears that there is even a method for capturing audio although this requires extra modules.

    Anyhow, it's all free and I'd be interested to hear if any of you have had a look at this? I'm using it on a Windows PC, but the website mentions Mac and Linux versions too.

    If you try it, would love to hear your thoughts

    Capture.JPG



  • Thanks for sharing this with us. On a closer look, though, I don't see where this does anything that Band in a Box (BIAB) can't do. BIAB might cost but it's had almost thirty years to refine and has a lot of tools. IMO, BIAB is well worth the extra cost.



  • Many thanks.
    Yes BIAB is great but I do not think It has a feature like this one.
    It seems Improvisor deserves to be explored.



  • @Kehaulani - I haven't used BIAB, but I'm not aware of any capability that it has to generate an improv line based on chords and melody that have been input. I am looking forward to getting my hands on BIAB in a couple of weeks (to make practise backing tracks) so will make a comparison.

    Impro-Visor has an extensive range of tools to shape the improv lines that are generated. For example you can draw a line over a chart to "shape" a solo. There are functions that use deep learning/neural networks to understand styles that the user creates then improvise using those styles.

    There has always been a problem of functionality vs ease of use for creators of computer programs. This is evident in I-V. So many tools, just a bit hard to navigate. I'll try to collect some sample output as I come to terms with the beast.



  • I'm not aware, either, of an improvising feature in BIAB that will construct an improvisation in accordance with a given melodic curve, although it certainly does have a feature that produces composed improvisations. I've, frankly, used it in a pinch.

    Regarding Impro-Visor's ability to identify passing tones, non-chord tones, chromatic notes and other melodic functions, to be blunt, the ability to do those things without technological help, are part of basic musicianship and you need it for future, spontaneous work anyway.

    I'm not saying that there might not be some things that some readers might not find interesting. Just pointing out that these shortcuts have little practical use in the long run.



  • @Kehaulani
    With BIAB you can generate a chorus over a chord progression but the results are quite poor. Usually useless.
    As far as understand, it seems Improvisor has an “analysis” feature that can be interesting. I will check this later. Of course that does not replace the personal analysis but you can compare your own with Improvisor.


  • Qualified Repair Techs

    I like analyzing a transcription the old fashioned way, on paper. I use iRealpro, though, and record myself often when I’m practicing changes. One of my college trumpet professors got me in the habit of transcribing myself when I played something I liked, and I still do that through the recordings. It not only helps me stay honest and grow as a player, but also lets me keep and own all the stuff I do that is more unique to me. It also keeps me from becoming a little too stagnant and boring.



  • MuseScore is another nice product that is free on line for music notations and can be found at: https://musescore.org/en



  • @flugelgirl said in Interesting composition tool: Impro-Visor:

    I like analyzing a transcription the old fashioned way, on paper. I use iRealpro, though, and record myself often when I’m practicing changes. One of my college trumpet professors got me in the habit of transcribing myself when I played something I liked, and I still do that through the recordings. It not only helps me stay honest and grow as a player, but also lets me keep and own all the stuff I do that is more unique to me. It also keeps me from becoming a little too stagnant and boring.


    Recording and critically listening to one's self takes a lot of courage, no joke. Its also the best way to improve one's skills. I can't count the times I thought I played something great and when I listened to the playback, it was horrible. The tonguing would be ragged, dynamics were non existent, phrasing sucked, etc..
    Listening to one's self is the great leveler. If you think you're good then go ahead and record yourself and see if what you're hearing is actually what you're hearing. This process will crush the weak and cause them to either dump the trumpet and pick up the clarinet, never record themselves again or just leave music altogether.


  • Global Moderator

    @Dr-GO said in Interesting composition tool: Impro-Visor:

    MuseScore is another nice product that is free on line for music notations and can be found at: https://musescore.org/en

    I like MuseScore quite a bit



  • @Dr-Mark said in Interesting composition tool: Impro-Visor:

    I can't count the times I thought I played something great and when I listened to the playback, it was horrible.

    You got that right. I remember one night I was, er, feeling good and recorded, with a MM1 recording, my playing French Horn on Mozart's Concerto Nr. 3. Listened to playback the next day. Didn't play Horn again for a couple of years.



  • @Kehaulani said in Interesting composition tool: Impro-Visor:

    . I remember one night I was, er, feeling good and recorded, with a MM1 recording, my playing French Horn on Mozart's Concerto Nr. 3. Listened to playback the next day. Didn't play Horn again for a couple of years.


    Yes, listening to one's self can be down right painful.
    The only thing I can promise is that if a person sticks with recording themselves and critically listening to the recording, they will get better. This might sound a little Platoon-ish but "Take the pain"! It will make you stronger.



  • @Dr-Mark said in Interesting composition tool: Impro-Visor:

    Yes, listening to one's self can be down right painful.

    Not necessarily so if you choose the right wine!



  • @Dr-GO said in Interesting composition tool: Impro-Visor:

    Not necessarily so if you choose the right wine!


    Do you know what my favorite wine is?
    "Waaaaa, I want a Bugatti"



  • @tjcombo said in Interesting composition tool: Impro-Visor:

    Impro-Visor

    Thanks for informing us !


  • Global Moderator

    As a software developer, I have thought of creating a web-based composition app like MuseScore. The thing is, this would be a lot of work!


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