Shallowest flugel mouthpieces?



  • What options are there for SHALLOW flugel pieces without going custom?

    Before anyone goes crazy and gets their panties in a bunch, I'm not planning to use this on flugel. I do prefer deeper V shaped peices on flugel in general.

    I do have a 1915 Martin slide trumpet that takes a flugel shank mouthpiece. I'd like to get a brighter more trumpet like tone.

    Thanks!



  • @mdwilliams said in Shallowest flugel mouthpieces?:

    What options are there for SHALLOW flugel pieces without going custom?

    Before anyone goes crazy and gets their panties in a bunch, I'm not planning to use this on flugel. I do prefer deeper V shaped peices on flugel in general.

    I do have a 1915 Martin slide trumpet that takes a flugel shank mouthpiece. I'd like to get a brighter more trumpet like tone.

    Thanks!

    Hmm, you could check Stork's website, they list their specs. But, "shallow" in flugel is relative for flugel. I have a shallow Stork Vacchiano that is cavernous.



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  • @FranklinD standard taper, I use the same shank in my Yamaha 6310Z flugel



  • @mdwilliams said in Shallowest flugel mouthpieces?:
    I do prefer deeper V shaped peices on flugel in general.

    Thanks!

    This just in: U versus V mouthpieces. Read this one with a grain of salt, as this research while reporting on tonal quality does not report on the range of tonal variability between the two types of cups:

    J Acoust Soc Am. 2013 Nov;134(5):3872-86. doi: 10.1121/1.4824338.
    Trumpet mouthpiece manufacturing and tone quality.
    Zicari M1, MacRitchie J, Ghirlanda L, Vanchieri A, Montorfano D, Barbato MC, Soldini E.
    Author information
    1
    Dipartimento Ricerca e Sviluppo, Scuola Universitaria di Musica, University of Applied Sciences and Arts of Southern Switzerland, via Soldino 9, CH-6900 Lugano, Switzerland.
    Abstract
    This article investigates the relationship between the shape of the mouthpiece and its acoustical properties in brass instruments. The hypothesis is that not only different volumes but also particular cup shapes affect the embouchure and the tone quality in both a physical and perceivable way. Three professional trumpet players were involved, and two different internal cup contours characterized by a "U" and a "V" shape with two types of throat junction (round and sharp) were chosen, based on a Vincent Bach 1 [1/2] C medium mouthpiece. A third intermediate contour was designed as a combination of these. Over 600 sound samples were produced under controlled conditions, the study involving four different stages: (1) Simulation of air-flow, (2) analysis of the sound spectra, (3) study of the players' subjective responses, and (4) perceptual analysis of their timbral differences. Results confirm the U shape is characterized by a stronger air recirculation and produces stronger spectral components above 8 kHz, compared to the V shape. A round throat junction may also be preferable to a sharp one in terms of playability. There is moderate agreement on the aural perception of these differences although the verbal attributes used to qualify these are not shared.


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    @mdwilliams Well, there is the Stomvi Mouthpiece System which I've extolled regularly on TM RIP. In the basic configuration, you get one rim of your choice, two shanks (trumpet and cornet or flugel) and eight different cups, ranging from FL - v-shaped and intended for flugel via A to F, F being the shallowest and best suited for screaming or picc work. And with that system (you can buy additional shanks and rims and cups) you can try out any mouthpiece combination you want and yet speedily (and inexpensively) return to your standard configuration.



  • The old Callet "Solo" flugel mouthpiece is pretty shallow, but actually finding one is the trick.


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