Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe



  • Here's a guy I like so much, my daughter got me an autographed picture of him for my birthday. There's a lot to learn in this short but informative video. Notice the quality of the student's sound and (for lack of a better word) lack of projection when compared to Hakan's. One of the things that's noticeable (from my perspective) is that Hakan knows how to listen to the room his trumpet is playing in verses the student only hears her trumpet. Also, our ears habituate fairly easy. Hakan was quick to tell her about some of her notes being out of tune (a lesson in slide use for some?) Oh, and what a gorgeous sound he has!
    Enjoy!



  • Interesting. A spin-off is when he's singing along loudly. That would drive me crazy. It's certainly an (unintended?) practice in concentration on only the music, regardless of what goes on around you.

    Notice that he goes for, in the words of Sir Thomas Beecham, "The Long Line". And how the breath is part of that. A constant air stream rather than one that is chopped up.



  • @Dr-Mark said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    One of the things that's noticeable (from my perspective) is that Hakan knows how to listen to the room his trumpet is playing in verses the student only hears her trumpet.

    Are you sure it's not just that she's playing straight into the mic while he's playing out "into the room" (ie less direct sound into the room and more reflected off the walls)?

    One observation I make is that the student sounds tense to begin with, which I guess should be expected.



  • Sorry. Just not digging on his sound. I kinda liked her original sound before he tried to change her. A good teacher teaches to play like them. A great teacher teaches the student to develop their own sound. He is listening but not hearing. ![alt text](image url)



  • I trained under Eugene Blee at the University of Cincinnati College Conservatory of Music. He encouraged me with developing my own voice. Never did he try to have me imitate him. He would ask me to sing it. But he would never sing or play a phrase from me to imitate. Giving a student to empower their own voice. Ah, that is the difference between a good and a great teacher.



  • @Jolter said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    Are you sure it's not just that she's playing straight into the mic while he's playing out "into the room" (ie less direct sound into the room and more reflected off the walls)?


    Hi Jolter,
    I can't be sure of anything as I wasn't there but I don't see a mic.



  • @Dr-GO said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:
    Sorry. Just not digging on Hakan's sound. I kinda liked her (the student's) original sound before Hakan tried to change her. A good teacher teaches to play like them. A great teacher teaches the student to develop their own sound. Hakan is listening but not hearing.

    Sorry you don't like the sound of Hakan Hardenberger on trumpet or Hakan's methodology of teaching. I'll try to find better examples of players and instructors.
    Thanks



  • @Dr-GO said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    I trained under Eugene Blee at the University of Cincinnati College Conservatory of Music.




  • @Kehaulani said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    Interesting. A spin-off is when he's singing along loudly. That would drive me crazy.

    My first teacher, a professor of music at the conservatory where I first studied, sang as I was trying to play and it absolutely drove me nuts. That and a few other nasty things he pulled drove me to leave the conservatory and take lessons from a professional trumpet player. It was the right move for me at the time, but I would have learned more about theory if I had stayed with the conservatory. But I was a teenager and in too much of a rush as many of us are at the stage in our life.



  • @GeorgeB said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    I would have learned more about theory if I had stayed with the conservatory.

    Hi GeorgeB,
    To heck with the conservatory!
    I'll just find some more tutorials on things like fugues, and sonata form and in no time flat you'll be a walking, talking theory machine.



  • @Dr-GO said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    I trained under Eugene Blee at the University of Cincinnati College Conservatory of Music. He encouraged me with developing my own voice. Never did he try to have me imitate him. He would ask me to sing it. But he would never sing or play a phrase from me to imitate. Giving a student to empower their own voice. Ah, that is the difference between a good and a great teacher.

    I think that's situational, wouldn't you say?

    If a student has a crappy sound, the teacher is a good role model. Kids and beginners are led to reach a certain point before they have the experience and taste to go it alone.

    On another note, regarding sound from a teacher. One of my teachers, who BTW had his Bachelor in Voice, would sing a little intermittingly when he wanted you to play something differently. That was pleasing and effective.

    But my first sax teacher, Sadao Watanabe, would give me a Charlie Parker transcription, have me play it faster and aster until I couldn't keep up and then he would be shouting, "You're f***ig up, you're f***ing up! Didn't really help.



  • @Kehaulani said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    If a student has a crappy sound, the teacher is a good role model. Kids and beginners are led to reach a certain point before they have the experience and taste to go it alone.

    Hi Kehaulani,
    In my opinion, you sure have a point. The development of sound is not an easy thing for many. Clark Terry once said something that stuck with me and it goes something like this; "First we imitate and later we innovate". I have my own particular way of helping students develop a good balanced sound which, over the decades has worked quite well. Once they develop a quality sound and the confidence that comes with it, they copy whatever hero they wish. Later, if they stick with it, they become themselves often with their own unique sound. However, if I listen hard, I can still hear echoes of the hero they once wanted to sound like.



  • The exact quote by Clark Terry is:

    imitate-assimilate-innovate



  • @Kehaulani said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    @Dr-GO said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:
    But my first sax teacher, Sadao Watanabe, would give me a Charlie Parker transcription, have me play it faster and aster until I couldn't keep up and then he would be shouting, "You're f***ig up, you're f***ing up! Didn't really help.

    I can relate to that situation.



  • @Kehaulani said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    The exact quote by Clark Terry is:
    imitate-assimilate-innovate

    Thanks for having my back!



  • @Kehaulani said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    @Dr-GO said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    I think that's situational, wouldn't you say?

    Yes. It is as it is a part of a teaching style.



  • Mr. Blee would autograph my lesson books and studies with learning tasks for the next week with: Know exercises x to a for next time. Then he would say verbally: "That will keep you off the streets."

    How profound, how true, and what a powerful lesson just that phrase would provide in my life.



  • @Dr-Mark said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    @Jolter said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    Are you sure it's not just that she's playing straight into the mic while he's playing out "into the room" (ie less direct sound into the room and more reflected off the walls)?


    Hi Jolter,
    I can't be sure of anything as I wasn't there but I don't see a mic.

    Well not to sound too poignant, but if there was no microphone present, we would not be hearing anything. 😉

    I meant whatever device is picking up the sound we're hearing, is positioned someplace. It may be on/in the camera, or in front of the stage, in which case the student is playing towards it while Håkan is playing away from it, to the side. That could explain a little of the rough edges since I think most players sound better with some acoustics between the bell and the mic. (He's still infinitely better sounding, I'm just saying he might have had some help from the room.)



  • Håkan is trying to unlock her ears and brain. She is a well accomplished technical player BUT she is not listening to the result of her playing in the room. She is playing "safe" inside her head. It will take time to develop these additional talents. She shows great promise!



  • @Jolter said in Håkan Hardenberger: How To Anticipate Pitch And Breathe:

    Well not to sound too poignant, but if there was no microphone present, we would not be hearing anything.

    Good point. I thought you meant a mic on stage but yes, if there wasn't a mic, we'd be watching a silent movie masterclass.


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