Mahler’s 5th



  • Mahler’s 5th



  • Mahler’s Fifth version 2:



  • In my opinion this is actually pretty good.

    The Tofanelli version is cool, but I wouldn't listen to it several times. I think Uri Caine genuinely captures the spirit of the original even though the style is completely different. Mahler wasn't going for "cool".



  • @Jolter said in Mahler’s 5th:

    In my opinion this is actually pretty good.

    The Tofanelli version is cool, but I wouldn't listen to it several times. I think Uri Caine genuinely captures the spirit of the original even though the style is completely different. Mahler wasn't going for "cool".


    Jolter,

    I wasn’t able to make your link work. Here is a different link to Uri Caine’s interpretation. It is not my cup of tea but nevertheless interesting.

    The next version is “the lost version of Mahler’s Fifth Symphony” as “discovered” by Charlie Geyer. The entire interview is interesting but the pertinent discussion about, and following performance of, the lost version, begins about 14:45. It’s an interesting “historical discovery”. I hope thst you enjoy it.



  • @SSmith1226 That last one is a doozy! Well worth the listen.

    Not sure why my embedded video didn't work for you - yours gives me a "Video Unavailable" error. Maybe it has something to do with geography and how the record companies segment their markets...



  • @Jolter
    I got the same “Video Unavailable” message when I tried to open your video. I’m located in the. USA specifically in Florida. Where are you?



  • Works in Texas? Did you try the Play in Youtube option? Click on Youtube on the vis window.





  • Hi SSmith1226,
    This is a really good video on how to interpret a piece. Elmer was asked questions like "What do you think the trumpet entrance could be? What is the mood?"
    These are serious questions for the soloist because the audience doesn't want to just "hear" what Elmer has to say. They want to "Feel" what Elmer (or any soloist) has to say. This is why I learn the words to pieces that have lyrics. That way I know what the composer was trying to convey and I try to put that into my trumpet. If there are no lyrics, I research the piece and find out what the composer was trying to convey. Students initially think I'm stupid for having them to learn what the lyrics are about. I've had them say, "But I'm a trumpet player, I don't need to know what the lyrics are about" I then explain the importance of conveying meaning through the horn. Being a soloist is more than just playing notes. Its telling a story and conveying emotion. This is a great video and I've used it many times to help explain the importance of conveying meaning with the trumpet to young students.



  • I was told long ago to always know the words to a song before you play it. It's simple. Know what the song is about.



  • @Kehaulani said in Mahler’s 5th:

    I was told long ago to always know the words to a song before you play it. It's simple. Know what the song is about.

    There's an often-repeated story about the great Ben Webster. On a gig, in the middle of a solo, he suddenly stopped playing altogether. Someone later asked him what happened. Webster said: "I forgot the words."


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