pet peeves



  • Dictionary says that "judgment" is the correct spelling,
    although 50 years ago "judgement" would have been the correct spelling.

    We "must" drop that "e" before the "-ment".

    But for "management" we are "required" to keep that "e" before the "-ment".

    And for "encouragement" we are "required" to keep that "e" before the "-ment".

    Why the change for "judgement" / "judgment"?
    If enough stupid people spell a word incorrectly for a long enough period of time,
    then the publishers of the dictionaries finally give in and change the official spelling "due to evolution of the spelling by the general population".

    That is also how "bad" came to mean "good" in American urban slang 50 years ago.

    Society is going to heck in a hand-basket.

    Now I just have 9,999 other pet peeves to post...

    Such as countless people on TV who say, "He talked to you and I".
    They apparently did not have to graduate from 3rd grade to become a TV writer or TV host or TV reporter.

    moshe



  • English is an inconsistent language, just ask a non-English speaker, trying the learn it. Getting frustrated over it is a waste of time.



  • And let us not even get started with English English vs American English.............😨


  • Global Moderator

    I had a college roommate from Singapore that spoke "English." Yeah, right.



  • I like me some English. It's all ok. 😃



  • @Kehaulani said in pet peeves:

    English is an inconsistent language, just ask a non-English speaker, trying the learn it. Getting frustrated over it is a waste of time.

    To, too. two true! It can be so, sew annoying! 🤓 🤓



  • People that say "on today" instead of just saying "today."



  • @Tobylou8 said in pet peeves:

    To, too. two true! It can be so, sew annoying!

    Now THAT is just knit picking!



  • A true pet peeve:

    Someone could be a nitwit (insult on one's intellect)

    OR

    Someone could be a nit wit (knowledgeable individual with advanced understanding of lice)
    2833ee5e-9a42-4675-92d8-944ccecd1c98-image.png



  • To most people, unionize means:
    e8b7fb5f-210e-4806-9964-94f78b3dd986-image.png

    To me, a chemist, unionize means:
    fb81625b-d8ac-426f-b897-09e116300fd5-image.png


  • Global Moderator

    In software, a "union" is a specific data type.



  • @mafields627 said in pet peeves:

    People that say "on today" instead of just saying "today."

    That's like everyone on TV who says "tuna-fish sandwich".

    What other kind of animal would "tuna" be other than "fish".

    No other kind of fish is called "xxxx-fish".

    New Yorkers who say "standing on line" instead of "standing in line".

    People on TV who keep saying "I was laying down" when they mean "I was lying down".

    People on TV who say "I'll drive further" when they mean "I'll drive farther."

    People on TV who say "mis-CHEE-vee-us" when ther is no extra "i" in the word to
    justify that pronunciation.

    People on TV who say "conversate" instead of "converse".

    Wow.
    Only 9,980 pet peeves to go...

    moshe



  • @Dr-GO said in pet peeves:

    @Tobylou8 said in pet peeves:

    To, too. two true! It can be so, sew annoying!

    Now THAT is just knit picking!


    You should have been writing scripts for the old 1930's and 1940's radio shows.

    A million people across America would simultaneously groan at bad puns, just as the writers intended.

    I won't recite the entire routine, but I'll go straight to the punch-line from a 1940's Edgar Bergen ventriloquist show:

    Dumb Mortimer Snerd asks the lumber yard owner about some boards that are lying on the ground:

    Mortimer: "What are them there holes?"

    Lumber yard guy says "Those are knot holes."

    Mortimer yells back "They are so holes !!!!! Just look at 'em !!!!!!!"

    moshe



  • @moshe said in pet peeves:

    @mafields627 said in pet peeves:

    No other kind of fish is called "xxxx-fish".

    moshe

    Swordfish. Or are you thinking "swordfish fish"?



  • Using "between" instead of "among". Example: "I had to choose between the three of them." 😡



  • @moshe said in pet peeves:

    @mafields627 said in pet peeves:

    People that say "on today" instead of just saying "today."

    That's like everyone on TV who says "tuna-fish sandwich".

    What other kind of animal would "tuna" be other than "fish".

    No other kind of fish is called "xxxx-fish".

    New Yorkers who say "standing on line" instead of "standing in line".

    People on TV who keep saying "I was laying down" when they mean "I was lying down".

    People on TV who say "I'll drive further" when they mean "I'll drive farther."

    People on TV who say "mis-CHEE-vee-us" when ther is no extra "i" in the word to
    justify that pronunciation.

    People on TV who say "conversate" instead of "converse".

    Wow.
    Only 9,980 pet peeves to go...

    moshe

    I get what you mean about Tuna, but there are other "fish" you may not have thought of.........Swordfish, sailfish, codfish, cuddlefish, jellyfish, goldfish, redfish, bluefish. Like when people say, Pizza Pie. Certainly. It’s not pizza cake, and Pizza means pie in Italian.
    Also, I always hear people say, "Chinese Take-out" as if it’s one word. Maybe it’s just that on the east coast, people sometimes have Chinese food named eat it in the restaurant.
    People say, Real-i-tor, rather than Real-tor.
    That’s enough for now....



  • One of my biggest language pet peeves, although I think it's a lost cause, is the use of "there's".

    Ex: " There's three cars in the parking lot."
    No, there ARE three cars. Either there IS one car in the parking or THERE ARE three cars. Three is plural.
    Singular subject = singular verb. Plural subject = plural verb. English 101.



  • @moshe said in pet peeves:

    New Yorkers who say "standing on line" instead of "standing in line".

    Also, never order a "Coffee and a roll" in a New York Deli.

    They'll give you the coffee, then beat the crap out of you!



  • Not a pet peeve, but with language ambiguities - my son studied one year in England. As part of his orientation program, he was given a three-page paper of words/phrases that mean different things. For instance "Bonnet, in American equals hat. Bonnet in England means a car's hood. Etc.

    Knock me up, sometime?



  • @Kehaulani said in pet peeves:

    Not a pet peeve, but with language ambiguities - my son studied one year in England. As part of his orientation program, he was given a three-page paper of words/phrases that mean different things.

    And we know what "Randy" means!

    Used in a sentence: The lad became randy when he saw his teacher in tight sweater and jeans. [...and I am not talking about a "name change"]


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