Jazz Trumpet Family Tree - Find Your Branch



  • I am reproducing the Jazz Trumpet Family Tree that is published in John McNeil's The Art of Jazz Trumpet:
    47b5b488-23ed-4369-9b7b-7e5600d3c7ba-image.png

    I edited it by entering my name and one of our other member's names Kenaulani highlighted in yellow. Do add your name to the discussion by responding to this thread as to which branch you are swinging on.


  • Global Moderator

    I suspect this took a long time to develop. I once created something similar for my trumpet professor.



  • Where's Louis Armstrong? Bix Beiderbecke? Doc Severinsen? Heck, even Maynard Ferguson?


  • Moderators

    @trickg said in Jazz Trumpet Family Tree - Find Your Branch:

    Where's Louis Armstrong? Bix Beiderbecke? Doc Severinsen? Heck, even Maynard Ferguson?

    Agreed. I see two spots that are labeled “many others” and “untold others”...but I think the whole tree could be revamped. Who has the knowledge and time to do it?

    Jon Faddis is branched right off of Dizzy...but no Arturo?

    Wouldn’t Buddy Bolden and King Oliver be near or at the very top?



  • My branch would be on the Bunny Berigan, Ziggy Elman, Chuck Peterson, Harry James, Bernie Glow and Conrad Gozzo limbs.

    My forte is really, 30s 40s lead trumpet.

    Also been told I play ballads a lot like Doc, big fat sound with hand vibrato.


  • Credentialed Professional

    I would add that Eddie Henderson also had a whole lot of Miles in his playing, and Donald Byrd in the late '60's/early 70's had some Miles too-in particularly when he used an echoplex. Pretty good list though-I think it's generally assumed that Louis Armstrong is at the top influencing everyone.



  • @Bay-Area-Brass said in Jazz Trumpet Family Tree - Find Your Branch:

    I would add that Eddie Henderson also had a whole lot of Miles in his playing, and Donald Byrd in the late '60's/early 70's had some Miles too-in particularly when he used an echoplex. Pretty good list though-I think it's generally assumed that Louis Armstrong is at the top influencing everyone.

    I agree, Eddie Henderson is on the tree and comes off the Freddie Hubbard branch. I love Eddie Henderson's playing and his versatility. If he had not been added already, I would have had a hard time placing him due to his fusion influence. And then I heard a more recent recording he did as a tribute to Woody Shaw, and until I heard it was Eddie recording a Woody tribute, I would have bet you anything it was Woody playing. Until then, I did not think it was possible for anyone to have that amazing sound of Woody Shaw. Then there is Eddie's own sound that comes out strong on Kenny Barron's Spirit Song Album:

    Also known in the Jazz world as "doc", Eddie has an MD, and initially did a residency in internal medicine only to realize his calling was psychiatry. He practiced as a psychiatrist for a bit before focusing nearly entirely on music performance. Would love to have him to contribute to our Medical Concerns section on this Website. Actually, I would LOVE to do a music and medicine session with him at the medical schools I am affiliated with!

    And I think it goes without saying, Louis is at the top looking down and smiling at all of his creation.

    By the way Bill, I would like to add you to that tree. At which branch shall I place you?



  • Where does Cindy Bradley land in this tree? She does play a great horn!! 😉 😉

    58f7e0b7-ccbe-4dba-b1da-79e76930fc3b-image.png



  • @Tobylou8 said in Jazz Trumpet Family Tree - Find Your Branch:

    Where does Cindy Bradley land in this tree?
    On my lap? 😼

    I don't know how to add it, but doesn't Wadada Leo Smith deserve a mention? And where?


  • Global Moderator

    I'm curious what that contraption is on the tuning slide of her instrument.



  • @administrator said in Jazz Trumpet Family Tree - Find Your Branch:

    I'm curious what that contraption is on the tuning slide of her instrument.

    Microphone transmitter? (or cigar case.........😎 )



  • @Robrtx That is the wireless transmitter which is attached to the microphone clipped to the bell of her trumpet. Looks like the
    Shure.



  • @trickg said in Jazz Trumpet Family Tree - Find Your Branch:

    Where's Louis Armstrong? Bix Beiderbecke?

    Update. McNeil actually addressed this in his paragraph introducing the draft. He noted that this chart reflects post war reference so leaves out those that preceded performers that became influential post 1946. He makes no mention as to why Maynard or Doc Severinsen was omitted.


  • Credentialed Professional

    @Dr-GO I would say my main most influential jazz trumpet players would be Miles Davis and Lee Morgan first and foremost, as well as Blue Mitchell, Wilbur Harden, Freddie Hubbard, Kenny Dorham.... Satchmo of course.

    All that being said, the more inclusive answer would be everyone on that list.



  • @Tobylou8 said in Jazz Trumpet Family Tree - Find Your Branch:

    Where does Cindy Bradley land in this tree? She does play a great horn!! 😉 😉

    From an interview on the Harrelson site, Ms Bradly was asked:

    Who are some of your musical influences?

    I love hard bop trumpet players and have studied their playing quite extensively. Freddie Hubbard, Clifford Brown, Blue Mitchell, and especially Lee Morgan. They have had the biggest influence on my trumpet playing. I’ve always been a huge Oscar Peterson fan as well.

    So I would place her under Lee Morgan.



  • He makes no mention as to why Maynard or Doc Severinsen was omitted.

    Although both have multitudes of admirers, could it be that McNeil doesn't find actual schools of influence from them?



  • @Kehaulani said in Jazz Trumpet Family Tree - Find Your Branch:

    He makes no mention as to why Maynard or Doc Severinsen was omitted.

    Although both have multitudes of admirers, could it be that McNeil doesn't find actual schools of influence from them?

    It may be that he considers the lead players in the "other" category that stems off of Dizzy (albeit he does list John Faddis separately). I looked all over for interviews with Doc as to his influences. I can only find reference to his father. I did find through this search that Maynard Ferguson listed Doc as his major influence so I would add Doc to come off of Dizzy, and Maynard off of Doc. HOWEVER if someone else can find (or has spoken to Doc) that knows of his major influence, please update and I will make the changes. In my search, clearly, Arturo was influenced by Dizzy as well. And I do find it interesting that Claudio Roditi was listed but not Arturo, who both grew together as musicians within Dizzy's big band. Interesting.

    See updated tree to follow.



  • FAMILY TREE UPDATE

    New updates highlighted in yellow:
    f21afb24-a58d-4e3b-87ac-62c2017f2a19-image.png



  • @Dr GO - are you sure of your remembrance of Maynard saying he's influenced by Doc? I don't hear it. Maynard's (earlier) improvisations were, IMO, much more sophisticated than Doc's; more, maybe to Brownie's.

    (Of course, you can be influenced by someone and sound like someone else. I was really influenced on alto by Art Pepper but, on listening to a jazz recording, I sounded more like late Sonny Red, LOL.)



  • @Kehaulani said in Jazz Trumpet Family Tree - Find Your Branch:

    @Dr GO - are you sure of your remembrance of Maynard saying he's influenced by Doc? I don't hear it. Maynard's (earlier) improvisations were, IMO, much more sophisticated than Doc's; more, maybe to Brownie's.

    (Of course, you can be influenced by someone and sound like someone else. I was really influenced on alto by Art Pepper but, on listening to a jazz recording, I sounded more like late Sonny Red, LOL.)

    Pretty sure. It was a Maynard interview. I will try to find it again, and then post it if found.


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