Exercises for super fast tonguing



  • The band I play with is doing a march called Colonel Bogey ( from Bridge On The River Quai ) and the last 66 bars of the march contain a series of four 8th notes played staccato in cut time. My attempts are spitty. Does anyone have a suggested exercise to help develop a nice clean dit dit dit dit.

    In my younger playing days I never played marches and at 83 my old tongue just doesn't seem to work that well on the real fast stuff.



  • @GeorgeB said in Exercises for super fast tonguing:

    The band I play with is doing a march called Colonel Bogey ( from Bridge On The River Quai ) and the last 66 bars of the march contain a series of four 8th notes played staccato in cut time. My attempts are spitty. Does anyone have a suggested exercise to help develop a nice clean dit dit dit dit.

    In my younger playing days I never played marches and at 83 my old tongue just doesn't seem to work that well on the real fast stuff.

    What arrangement? I've played it but I don't remember that being in our arrangement. You could go to you tube and play along with these Arbans single tongue exercises. You can go to the setting menu (little gear) and play it at half speed and the pitch stays the same. Here's an example. I would suggest "Tu Tu" for single tonguing.



  • Well George, I am 73..not far behind you. I truly want to get as good as possible. And you can work on it. But just work on double/triple tonguing. You can get better quicker in this area. Since I now have a good instructor I improved my technique a lot on those techniques. He wants me to do it more like doo-ga and more at the end of my tongue.

    Good luck george!!



  • @Tobylou8
    There is a youtube of the arrangement we use done by The Coldstream Guards.
    The video of suggested exercises you posted is actually slower in tempo than our arrangement of Bogey. I have been playing those in the Bogey march over and over but it sounds spitty and not really sharp. Thanks for you suggestion, though.



  • @adc
    Thanks, I need all the luck I can get...☺



  • @GeorgeB said in Exercises for super fast tonguing:

    @Tobylou8
    There is a youtube of the arrangement we use done by The Coldstream Guards.
    The video of suggested exercises you posted is actually slower in tempo than our arrangement of Bogey. I have been playing those in the Bogey march over and over but it sounds spitty and not really sharp. Thanks for you suggestion, though.

    Maybe double tonguing will get it done. If this is the part you're talking about at 2:00 then ta-ka ta-ka double tongue is what I'd do. And now I remember playing this arrangement too! It can be a tongue twister for sure!



  • @GeorgeB said in Exercises for super fast tonguing:

    @adc
    Thanks, I need all the luck I can get...☺
    I hear 'ya George. BTW its "dig-a-dig-a-dig-a" Just learning it..lol



  • Here is a unique tonguing exercise and perhaps with strength there is speed:



  • I' having the same problem with Buglers Holiday, lots of tonguing
    on that one.



  • Allen Vizzuti has many great single tonguing exercises in his first book of technical studies, and he also has a great warm down routine somewhere that has (oddly enough) increased my single tongue speed the most. This is because I set the metronome at a speed higher than I could do it before, and by forcing myself to do it, it got better. For double tonguing work on the k tongue by itself.



  • @Tobylou8 said in Exercises for super fast tonguing:

    @GeorgeB said in Exercises for super fast tonguing:

    @Tobylou8
    There is a youtube of the arrangement we use done by The Coldstream Guards.
    The video of suggested exercises you posted is actually slower in tempo than our arrangement of Bogey. I have been playing those in the Bogey march over and over but it sounds spitty and not really sharp. Thanks for you suggestion, though.

    Maybe double tonguing will get it done. If this is the part you're talking about at 2:00 then ta-ka ta-ka double tongue is what I'd do. And now I remember playing this arrangement too! It can be a tongue twister for sure!

    Yep, that's it, and your suggestion of double tonguing is worth a try. Anyway, it sure is hard on my 83 year old tongue..LOL



  • @lukarino

    Could you reference the Vizzuti book title. I'm very interested!

    Mike



  • @Three-Sevens said in Exercises for super fast tonguing:

    @lukarino

    Could you reference the Vizzuti book title. I'm very interested!

    Mike

    Yes, me too.



  • @Three-Sevens @GeorgeB

    The book is the Allen Vizzuti Trumpet Method, Book 1 Technical Studies. The tonguing exercises in this book (single, double, triple) are great. They are a little more accessible than the arban exercises IMO as well (the ranges were a little more comfortable for me when my range was developing). There’s a triple tongue exercise (no. 37) specifically that is very good as well.

    As far as the warmdown, I am not exactly sure what book it comes from but it’s from Vizzuti. It is a killer warmdown. If you PM me I can send you a copy, I got mine from a friend.



  • What has worked best for me is setting a metronome at the tempo I can play evenly and then single tonguing each note from low C to tuning C and back down. Kind of like a long tone exercise only you substitute 16th notes for each note and play them until you run out of air. Then take the horn off you face and rest. Move to the next note. Rinse and repeat.



  • @lukarino

    Thanks! I will get a copy into my library!

    Mike



  • @GeorgeB some arrangers of marches are very unimaginative and write nasty parts for 2nd and 3rd cornets/trumpets don't they? My suggestion is to get your double-tonguing up to speed. It's far easier to cruise through a long stretch of semi-quavers even if you can single tongue at that speed.

    A few years back a teacher gave me an exercise to develop triple-tonguing that is equally applicable to building double-tonguing speed and technique: Simply pick a scale that is comfortably in your range - maybe F major and start - (F) tktk tktk taaaaa (G) tktk tktk taaaa and so on, up and down the scale. Do it slowly at first, concentrating on getting the articulation clean and even. Getting the articulation clean is more important that speed ( +1 for the suggestion above to practice just "K" articulation too).

    I won't buy into the discussion about tuku vs taka except to say that it's a case of what ever works in you head - dugu dugu works for me ☺


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