Valve combination 1 and 3



  • I think it's only for D and G below the staff. As a beginner , this particular combo seems to require a different airstream or attack. I am I alone on this?



  • @Doodlin said in Valve combination 1 and 3:

    I think it's only for D and G below the staff. As a beginner , this particular combo seems to require a different airstream or attack. I am I alone on this?

    Officially, I would say that is correct, however the 1&3 combination can be used and held down he entire time for playing D G B G arpeggios and bugle type calls so you don’t have to move to different fingerings, but I know the intonation would be affected. I use that combination for the D on the 4th line with my C trumpet sometimes for better intonation. So you see, there are some exceptions.



  • A Bb trumpet has longer valve slides than a C trumpet, because it is lower.

    The 3 valves lower the pitch of the trumpet by one whole tone, one halftone, and a tone and a half respectively.

    When we press down the first valve, we change from a trumpet in Bb to one in Ab. When we add the third valve it is too short. That is why we have that finger ring on most third valve slides, to help us compensate for low D and C#.



  • 1&3 is also to sharpen middle D and also to change timbres in an improvised solos, i.e. going back and forth between 1 and 1&3 on a middle D.



  • Thanks for the replies. I find it fascinating when learning about the different acoustical properties of musical instruments.

    b3427f42-09cf-474f-b476-5f8777529db9-image.png



  • @Doodlin said in Valve combination 1 and 3:

    Thanks for the replies. I find it fascinating when learning about the different acoustical properties of musical instruments.

    b3427f42-09cf-474f-b476-5f8777529db9-image.png

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