Getzen Club



  • Several of us play Getzen horns regularly. Perhaps this thread will come to serve as a repository for all things Getzen.

    I think I have owned four Getzen Bb trumpets so far: three Severinsens and one 900 Eterna Classic. Presently, a mid-1970s Severinsen is my primary horn. My current silver plated Sev is in remarkably good condition. Looking at it and concluding that it is nearly new is an easy thing to do. It has the usual adjustable third valve slide finger ring and no tuning aid on the first valve slide. It is light, responsive, produces great sound, and fits me perfectly. The valves work marvelously.

    There are some who criticize the plastic slide stops commonly found on the Sev's and some other Getzen trumpets. Not me. I like them. They are quiet and do not project below the third valve slide, also I have never had one break or cause a single issue. They are easy to remove and replace for maintenance purposes too. They can be a little difficult to find. I have two for backups, but wonder if I will ever need them. I have experimented with the three adjustment slots on the slide stops. The slot nearest to the center of the stop works well for my third valve tuning needs.

    Jim



  • I played a Severinsen in college (UNT) and in the service. Since then, I've had two more of them, getting rid of them, all.

    My first one served me well and it was a fine horn. (Two tuning slides, one of the early ones). Although I used it in concert band, it seemed to me to be more commercial and I played in big bands and soul bands with it, as well.

    The last two I've had were part of a horn Safari. My use has changed and I lean more towards horns I can darken. While it's possible with a Severinsen, it was easier on some others. The Severinsen was just a little too bright for me. If you want a sound like Doc's, that's fine. I don't.

    A word about the valves. It seems almost mandatory to include how they're the best in the business. Hogwash. I've never had a horn with valve problems. That includes various Schilkes, Constellations, Benges, Committees and Yamahas.

    Let's say, for the case of argument, that Getzens are 100%. All your other horns are 90%. But you only need them to be at 80%. It's a non-starter.



  • @Comeback said in Getzen Club:

    There are some who criticize the plastic slide stops commonly found on the Sev's and some other Getzen trumpets. Not me. I like them. They are quiet and do not project below the third valve slide, also I have never had one break or cause a single issue. They are easy to remove and replace for maintenance purposes too. They can be a little difficult to find. I have two for backups, but wonder if I will ever need them. I have experimented with the three adjustment slots on the slide stops. The slot nearest to the center of the stop works well for my third valve tuning needs.

    I've got a 1997 700S and it doesn't look or feel a day older than my 2018 800S. The 700S has the plastic stop, and I'm a fan as well. Downright elegant design, IMHO, but I did have one break. At the time I found a replacement on Amazon, although I don't see it there now. But they can be found:

    https://www.hickeys.com/music/brass/trumpet/accessories/custom_and_replacement_parts/products/sku125082-getzentrumpet-3rd-valve-slide-stop-plastic.php

    My 1959 Connstellation 28A was built before they started adding slide stops, and I wished it had a Getzen style stop. Others talk about using a string, which is decidedly NOT elegant. I use two zip ties -- one on the third slide and one on the tube exiting the main tuning slide, with heads positioned to interfere. Just rotate one to remove the slide. Call it semi-elegant ๐Ÿ˜Ž ๐Ÿ˜Ž

    ConnSlideStop.jpg



  • @Shifty said in Getzen Club:

    My 1959 Connstellation 28A was built before they started adding slide stops, and I wished it had a Getzen style stop. Others talk about using a string, which is decidedly NOT elegant. I use two zip ties -- one on the third slide and one on the tube exiting the main tuning slide, with heads positioned to interfere. Just rotate one to remove the slide. Call it semi-elegant ๐Ÿ˜Ž ๐Ÿ˜Ž

    I have a 1960 Conn 6B Victor, and I secure the 3rd valve slide with a black elastic pony tail holder looped around the brace between the lower tuning slide and 3rd valve receivers, with both ends slipped over the finger ring screw. It holds the slide in, but has enough stretch to easily move the slide for intonation help. It has the added bonus of helping return the slide...lol

    15F424EE-4D58-4460-AF7E-5535A25FB82D.jpeg



  • @Shifty, a section mate in community band plays a 700S and loves it. He may also own an 800S! Thank you for posting the link for plastic slide stops. If this thread endures as a source of information for those that own and play Getzen trumpets, it should be quite useful. The 900 Eterna Classic I owned had a clever slide stop, but I do not remember it as having any provision for adjustment.

    Jim



  • @Dale-Proctor said in Getzen Club:

    I have a 1960 Conn 6B Victor, and I secure the 3rd valve slide with a black elastic pony tail holder looped around the brace between the lower tuning slide and 3rd valve receivers, with both ends slipped over the finger ring screw. It holds the slide in, but has enough stretch to easily move the slide for intonation help. It has the added bonus of helping return the slide...lol

    I use scrunchies to hold my third valve slides all the way in when the horns are sitting on a stand (not in use). I know many use elastic bands the way you do when playing, but my ring finger refuses to move without a sympathetic movement by both my middle finger and pinky, so the horn wobbles all over. A vulcan grip (using the middle finger) doesn't work for me either. So I'm stuck using my pinky alone to operate the third valve slide. And it's barely strong enough to work a pretty slick slide with no elastic. ๐Ÿ˜–



  • I am the proud owner of a 1961 Getzen Power Bore and 1974 Getzen Eterna 4-Valve. Both play with exceptional tonal accuracy and the Power Bore is laser accurate in hitting note. Better than any horn I have ever played. And as a large bore horn, plays with minimal resistance.
    d905beba-3950-43f4-8aaa-96377498b5df-image.png



  • Thanks for sharing, @Dr-GO ! I have no experience with the Power Bores. What mouthpiece do you use with it? How would you characterize its tonal color? Do you use the 4 valve flugel for gigging? Is it any problem switching back and forth from a 4 valve to a three valve instrument?

    My Getzens have not seemed to me to be too sensitive to mouthpiece choice. I have been playing my current Sev with a Curry 3C. and am quite happy with the combination.

    Jim



  • My mid-70s Severinsen is below. The case is an old Reunion Blues gig bag that still gets a lot of use.

    Jim

    AE8AA2B9-DCAE-4AF5-966B-A68BCB73459C.jpeg



  • @Comeback said in Getzen Club:

    Thanks for sharing, @Dr-GO ! I have no experience with the Power Bores. What mouthpiece do you use with it?

    Jim

    Jim I use my Jettone Studio B for 2 reasons. 1) I use the Power Bore for lead playing. 2) The Studio B backbone matches the gap characteristics of the Power Bore leadpipe perfectly.



  • @Comeback said in Getzen Club:

    Thanks for sharing, @Dr-GO ! I have no experience with the Power Bores. How would you characterize its tonal color?
    Jim
    Tonal color is bright, crisp and projecting. Perfect as a lead horn.



  • As for the flugelhorn question Jim, I use it for outdoor concerts as it too has a large bore and projects well. I also use it for soft rock and recording more up beat ballads.

    Here is a link to a recording I made using the Getzen Eterna on an up beat ballad:

    Switching between 3 and 4 valves is easy as your ears almost guide you into knowing when you will need that quarter tone adjustment and using it to bridge into the pedal tones just feels so natural with 4 valves.



  • By the way, we have at least 3 well known members here that use the 4 valve Eterna flugelhorn. Rowuk, Vulgano Brother and tmd. It would be nice to get their feedback on this flugelhorn as well.



  • Thank you for all of the great information, Dr GO!

    Jim



  • Dr. GO, I thought you played a Committee for everything.



  • @Dr-GO said in Getzen Club:

    As for the flugelhorn question Jim, I use it for outdoor concerts as it too has a large bore and projects well. I also use it for soft rock and recording more up beat ballads.

    Here is a link to a recording I made using the Getzen Eterna on an up beat ballad:

    Switching between 3 and 4 valves is easy as your ears almost guide you into knowing when you will need that quarter tone adjustment and using it to bridge into the pedal tones just feels so natural with 4 valves.

    Listened to that ballad twice, Dr GO. Thank you for posting it. Your fine soloing showcased the Getzen 4 valve flugel effectively. The piano soloing was pretty cool too!

    Jim



  • @Kehaulani said in Getzen Club:

    Dr. GO, I thought you played a Committee for everything.

    Nearly everything (at least 80% of my performances) as I play the Committee for most small group ensemble pieces, will use the Kanstul flugelhorn for soft, slow ballads. So these are the two horns that follow me on MOST gigs (as most gigs use the small group - quintet)

    I use the Harreslon for big band and large outdoor venues as well as the Getzen flugelhorn at outdoor events.



  • @Comeback said in Getzen Club:

    Listened to that ballad twice, Dr GO. Thank you for posting it...The piano soloing was pretty cool too!

    Jim

    The piano solo was performed by Kenny Drew Jr. Both Kenny Drew and Kenny Barron were contacted by Eddie for this CD and both were wanting to record this, but Eddie chose Kenny Drew due to the high energy of the songs Eddie chose for this album. I think he made an excellent choice with Kenny Drew. Kenny Drew and our drummer, Mark Lomax really fed on each other's energy as you may have noted from listening to these recordings. This album has a song called Trane Thing where both Kenny and Mark just explode with the emotion, certainly not a recording for the weak of heart!



  • I had mentioned in my initial post that I once owned a Getzen Eterna 900 Classic. I thought I would share my impressions of the horn. I bought the Classic because I wanted one brand new horn for my trumpet comeback effort. I had researched it, and relying on my positive experience with Severinsens, made the decision to buy. I was a little surprised when I received it because there was a bit of a problem with one valve. I was not surprised at all by Getzenโ€™s response to my report of the issue. They took care of the problem right away and I had a fine new trumpet.

    The Classic is promoted like this by Getzen: โ€œNumerous requests from fans of the early 900 convinced the Getzen Company to return to the original specifications and reintroduce the trumpet as the 900 Eterna Classic.โ€ I found this to be fairly accurate. Playing characteristics are nearly identical. There are some differences though. Some of these can be seen by comparing the photo of my current Sev with the photo of the Classic below. The wrap on the Classic is a little tighter than the Sev. There are slight differences in the bell shape too, which I found when fitting mutes. However, I found no shortcomings with my Classic. It met all of my expectations. The only reason I parted with it was due to a health condition I developed a couple years ago that seemed to spell the end of my trumpet playing days. Thankfully the health issue is behind me now. I miss my Classic, but my current Sev fills that void.

    Jim

    37fd2cd7-8350-496c-9b60-c917d52b8e22-image.jpeg https://trumpetboards.com/assets/uploads/files/1587662664558-7bd393b7-9337-4275-9ee4-4a0756a52dfc-image.jpeg



  • Does Classic, in this sense, mean the Severinsen?

    Since it's new, contractual obligations may prohibit the name Severinsen. So does the Classic actually hearken back to the Severinsen or are they two different horns?


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