Hip-Bone & Wayne Bergeron About High Notes



  • If you've not seen the series Hip-Bone with Michael Davis, it's great. He interviews some of the best trumpet players in the world such as Malcom McNab, Phil Smith, Wayne Bergeron, Lew Soloff and the list goes on.
    Here's a link to get you there.
    Enjoy



  • He says the high notes do not come from the oral cavity's shape but from air compression. But what is compression?



  • @Kehaulani said in Hip-Bone & Wayne Bergeron About High Notes:

    He says the high notes do not come from the oral cavity's shape but from air compression. But what is compression?

    I can’t play high at all. On a good day I can squeeze out a D. My understanding of compression is that it is the air behind your embouchure, and in to the mouthpiece being “compressed” which is to say that it’s forced at high velocity through a small aperture, which is a combination of lips taut so that they vibrate at a high frequency, which is is amplified, or encouraged, by a mouthpiece that aids that “compression.”

    -TJ



  • @Kehaulani said in Hip-Bone & Wayne Bergeron About High Notes:

    He says the high notes do not come from the oral cavity's shape but from air compression.


    High notes (or any note) are determined by the size of the aperture. Bergeron speaks of putting a lot of emphasis on the aperture at the beginning of the video.
    From the little I know, manipulation of the oral cavity (aaaaa to EEEEE) can assist but, does not determine the pitch.



  • @Dr-Mark I've tried at various times some of the music and warmups from the Hip-Bone website, and have found it to be good and challenging stuff.



  • @neal085 said in Hip-Bone & Wayne Bergeron About High Notes:

    I've tried at various times some of the music and warmups from the Hip-Bone website, and have found it to be good and challenging stuff.


    Yes, I totally agree. I own Michael Davis' Trumpets 11 text and play along. Its a lot of fun and I highly recommend it.



  • I've been wondering about compression for a while. This morning I asked Jim Manley about it. I asked when he is talking about compression, is he talking about aperture or air.

    This is what he said, "The aperture can cause compression by simply getting smaller (resisting the air). Try letting air come out of your mouth naturally. (not forcing) Then form your aperture around that air. You aren't blowing harder or faster, but the lips act like compressors. You can also increase compression with your body (I think here he is talking about using your abs and intercostals to compress the air) but most folks overdo this. It doesn't take that much compression to play trumpet."

    This makes sense to me.



  • Hi Mike,
    What I've found is that the smaller my aperture gets (while exhaling the same amount of air) the tighter my abs get. It's as if one thing leads to another and my aperture causes the abs to tighten or loosen. An example would be when a person blows through the tube that holds paper towels verses blowing the same amount of air through a coffee stir. If you try this, I think you'll see what I mean. The big thing is to not force the wind. Just make the hole smaller, don't force the wind and the abs seem to tighten on their own.
    There's also a "compressed" hot sound. Its the difference between the sound of someone like Alison Balsom playing a F above high C and someone like Bergeron playing the same note.



  • Yep. I have a tendency to push too much with my abs. I think it comes from several years of study with a Claude Gordon student.



  • Hi Mike,
    Here's something to try if you're up to it.
    First, take in a breath like you're yawning.
    Next, start on first space F and blow as if you're simply exhaling (not forced)
    Next, going up, play A, then C, then F. Don't force the air, just naturally make the aperture smaller and see what the abs do on their own.
    Next, start on F at the top of the staff (blow easy!)
    then going up, play A, C, and F above high C.
    If you maintain a (non-forced) wind, the abs will tighten on their own.
    I can only speak for me but if I consciously tighten the abs, I'll lose the note.
    Once you get the connection between "as I make the hole smaller (not forcing the wind) the abs will tighten on their own" It will all make sense. No joke.


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