1953 Conn 80A Cornet



  • Great mechanical condition. Fair cosmetically. No real dents.

    ![0_1553356874775_IMG_2194.JPG](Uploading 100%)

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/323748966572?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649



  • Appears to be a transitional model with the mixed brass and silver/nickel slides! Nice cornet!



  • @Tobylou8 said in 1953 Conn 80A Cornet:

    Appears to be a transitional model with the mixed brass and silver/nickel slides! Nice cornet!

    I wished I liked playing it. I mean it plays like its supposed to but its almost a trumpet. And I am selling it for exactly what I paid for it + $$ I put in to fix it up. Probably You can find one cheaper. Who knows.

    I would give it to some kid in a minute but the stupid valve design would be a problem for a kid. It was an ignorant design by Conn. They did a lot of innovation but you would have thought they would move on after 30 or forty years of this design.



  • @adc said in 1953 Conn 80A Cornet:

    @Tobylou8 said in 1953 Conn 80A Cornet:

    Appears to be a transitional model with the mixed brass and silver/nickel slides! Nice cornet!

    I wished I liked playing it. I mean it plays like its supposed to but its almost a trumpet. And I am selling it for exactly what I paid for it + $$ I put in to fix it up. Probably You can find one cheaper. Who knows.

    I would give it to some kid in a minute but the stupid valve design would be a problem for a kid. It was an ignorant design by Conn. They did a lot of innovation but you would have thought they would move on after 30 or forty years of this design.

    That design was made into the late 60's I believe.



  • I sold one like that last year for $225, a 1954 model. It played well, but I never used it.

    7866C30A-4D13-421E-AE5B-C9FD0C1B9561.jpg



  • I have a couple of early 20's 80A's and they have conventional valves. Not sure when the switch was.



  • @N1684T said in 1953 Conn 80A Cornet:

    I have a couple of early 20's 80A's and they have conventional valves. Not sure when the switch was.

    Conn switched to those stupid, complicated bottom-sprung valves in the early 1930s.



  • Okay. I like bottom sprung valves. So much less complicated. I can switch them out for the feel I like. And when putting the valves back in the casings, there's no way to get them turned in the wrong direction. Very simple system that works great, for me. My 80A always gets admiring looks from the trumpet playing crowd and they love the feel of the valves when they try it.

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  • They all work a designed, don't they?



  • @Richard-III said in 1953 Conn 80A Cornet:

    Okay. I like bottom sprung valves. So much less complicated. I can switch them out for the feel I like. And when putting the valves back in the casings, there's no way to get them turned in the wrong direction. Very simple system that works great, for me. My 80A always gets admiring looks from the trumpet playing crowd and they love the feel of the valves when they try it.

    You can switch the springs inside a spring barrel with about the same amount of effort and you don''t have to deal with making sure that the spring is lodged inside the bottom valve cap just so. A plus for bottom springs is that spring barrels make a scratching noise if the springs are out of round very much. It takes a lot to for bottom springs to have the same problem. I usually find it to be a real pain trying to get a bottom sprung cap to thread easily.



  • Most seem easier if you insert the spring in the bottom cap, thread on, THEN put the valve in. After 20-30, done the hard way, i figured that out;)



  • @Richard-III said in 1953 Conn 80A Cornet:

    Okay. I like bottom sprung valves. So much less complicated. I can switch them out for the feel I like. And when putting the valves back in the casings, there's no way to get them turned in the wrong direction. Very simple system that works great, for me. My 80A always gets admiring looks from the trumpet playing crowd and they love the feel of the valves when they try it.

    I would have given my 80A to a needy school kid but oiling the valves is to hard. Gluing the corks to the top of the piston helps. But I personally think its the dumbest idea Conn ever came up with. Hint: It is no longer used and no onelse uses it. Once in a blue moon I can change top springs out in about 5 minutes. But again..just me. Almost ever old cornet IO have bought (a bunch) immediately gets Yamaha springs

    That horn is mighty pretty!!!!!



  • @adc said in 1953 Conn 80A Cornet:

    @Richard-III said in 1953 Conn 80A Cornet:

    Okay. I like bottom sprung valves. So much less complicated. I can switch them out for the feel I like. And when putting the valves back in the casings, there's no way to get them turned in the wrong direction. Very simple system that works great, for me. My 80A always gets admiring looks from the trumpet playing crowd and they love the feel of the valves when they try it.

    I would have given my 80A to a needy school kid but oiling the valves is to hard. Gluing the corks to the top of the piston helps. But I personally think its the dumbest idea Conn ever came up with. Hint: It is no longer used and no onelse uses it. Once in a blue moon I can change top springs out in about 5 minutes. But again..just me. Almost ever old cornet IO have bought (a bunch) immediately gets Yamaha springs

    That horn is mighty pretty!!!!!

    Cool. Give it to me. I have no problem with the valves. ☺


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