Another Intro


  • Moderators

    I’m liking the introductions that have been posted by the admin and our other moderators...so I thought I might join in!

    I go by Kujo on these forums. It is a longtime nickname of mine and I decided to carry it on from TM to here.

    I have been a music student from the age of 6. Trumpet was the first instrument that I was actually taught, so that became my “strength”...however I have always considered myself a multi-instrumentalist.

    These days, I mainly play flugelhorn along with a growing collection of keyboard instruments. I love blues, rock, jazz, folk, singer/songwriter, and more!

    Outside of music, I really enjoy being a craftsman. Woodworking has been my central focus, but I am a student of leathercraft, smithing, pottery, and just about anything that can be crafted into heirloom quality items.

    You’ll notice that I’m not a “heavy poster”...but I am present daily to read, learn, and assist where I can!

    Feel free to message me with questions or concerns, and I’ll do what I can to help!



  • Hi Kujo 20



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  • @Dr-Mark said in Another Intro: ...Academically, I'm a former professor of psychology with an additional academic background in Business and Industrial Relations and my specialty was to teach undergraduate and graduate level statistics and research methodology and undergraduate and graduate level economics...

    Interesting. I have a BA in psychology with a minor in economics, heavy on statistics. I never used the degree professionally, though, and have forgotten most of it since I graduated 45 years ago...lol



  • @Bob-Pixley said in Another Intro:

    and have forgotten most of it (psychology & economics) since I graduated 45 years ago...lol


    This is the situation for 99% of the people on this site when asked "what did they learn in college or high school". Heck, the only thing that kept me fresh was teaching it and learning new stuff about the fields and incorporating it into my classes. This leads me to what I use to tell students; "What does a degree say to your future employer? That you're trainable".



  • @Dr-Mark said in Another Intro:

    This is the situation for 99% of the people on this site when asked "what did they learn in college or high school". . . This leads me to what I use to tell students; "What does a degree say to your future employer? That you're trainable".

    Sorry to disagree, but I learned a great deal in school, both from my teachers and from fellow students. Furthermore, you can't even get asked to hand in your application for many jobs without a degree.


  • Global Moderator

    @Kehaulani Yet for many jobs a degree can be a hindrance. In my career, I applied for many interesting jobs and was refused on the grounds of "being overqualified."



  • @barliman2001 said in Another Intro:

    @Kehaulani Yet for many jobs a degree can be a hindrance. In my career, I applied for many interesting jobs and was refused on the grounds of "being overqualified."

    I've had the same experience and, as a matter of fact, my son went to North Texas as a music major and works in the computer software field. That still doesn't mean that some of what one learned in school is useless, just inapplicable for the job applied for at hand.



  • @Kehaulani said in Another Intro:

    Sorry to disagree


    See! There's the 1%.


  • Global Moderator

    @Kehaulani said in Another Intro:

    @barliman2001 said in Another Intro:

    @Kehaulani Yet for many jobs a degree can be a hindrance. In my career, I applied for many interesting jobs and was refused on the grounds of "being overqualified."

    I've had the same experience and, as a matter of fact, my son went to North Texas as a music major and works in the computer software field. That still doesn't mean that some of what one learned in school is useless, just inapplicable for the job applied for at hand.

    This is my situation. I have found, however, that many of the skills I learned as a music major, such as cooperation, critical thinking and problem solving, as well as intense work ethic have helped me to succeed in this field.



  • @administrator said in Another Intro:

    @Kehaulani said in Another Intro:

    @barliman2001 said in Another Intro:

    @Kehaulani Yet for many jobs a degree can be a hindrance. In my career, I applied for many interesting jobs and was refused on the grounds of "being overqualified."

    I've had the same experience and, as a matter of fact, my son went to North Texas as a music major and works in the computer software field. That still doesn't mean that some of what one learned in school is useless, just inapplicable for the job applied for at hand.

    This is my situation. I have found, however, that many of the skills I learned as a music major, such as cooperation, critical thinking and problem solving, as well as intense work ethic have helped me to succeed in this field.

    My son has a company that writes software and constructs various computer system business applications. He has a degree in computer engineering and computer science. He has a natural aptitude. He says when he has to hire people to assist with some major project he doesn't place much weight on educational resume details. He gives prospects a programming problem test to see what their work looks like and how they solve problems. He's found that educational history often doesn't reflect actual skill and competence. I've found that to be true about most pursuits in life.



  • @Bob-Pixley said in Another Intro:

    Interesting. I have a BA in psychology with a minor in economics, heavy on statistics. I never used the degree professionally, though, and have forgotten most of it since I graduated 45 years ago...lol

    I have a BS in liberal arts (chemistry major). I had a couple of amazing college English classes that taught me the critical reading and writing skill that I still use today: One was called the Rhetoric of No. My writing cuts to the foundation this course gave me. While I am pleased that I have written 40+ scientific and medical articles, my real contributions from this course has been my role as award winning reviewer for the American Association of Medical Colleges, Editorial Board Member for the American Academy of Pediatrics, Associate Editor for the American College of Physicians Annals of Internal Medicine/ACP Journal Club; and Clinical Standards Reviewer for United HealthCare.

    In my Junior year of college, as a chemistry major, mind you, I took a dare from a pre-law student to take a 300 level Political Science Course called "The American Congress". Not only did I get an A+ in that course, but also learned the process of writing bills before Congress, and as a Physician Member an an Institute of Medicine, was able to draft a bill called the "Primary Care Promotions Act" that not only passed both houses of Congress, but with bipartisan support by both houses, all from my knowledge gleaned from this course and this act is still law to this day guaranteeing Federal Funding under Medicare for training advanced primary care physicians.



  • @Dr-GO said in Another Intro:

    One was called the Rhetoric of No.

    Sounds like an Eckhart Tolle book. 😁

    My first year in college, for a final exam in philosophy, the teacher said, "Take out a piece of paper and answer the following question. "Why?"

    One student was almost immediately finished and when he turned his paper in, we were sure he folded and would surely get an "F". We continued on, filling up the whole time with heady, supported opinions.

    Later, we found out he got an "A".
    To the question, "Why" he had written "Why not?" 😨


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